Treatments

Cardiac ablation is a procedure that can correct heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias). Cardiac ablation works by scarring or destroying tissue in your heart that triggers or sustains an abnormal heart rhythm. In some cases, cardiac ablation prevents abnormal electrical signals from entering your heart and, thus, stops the arrhythmia. Cardiac ablation usually uses long, flexible tubes (catheters) inserted through a vein or artery in your groin and threaded to your heart to deliver energy in the form of heat or extreme cold to modify the tissues in your heart that cause an arrhythmia.

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Carotid endarterectomy is a procedure to treat carotid artery disease. This disease occurs when fatty, waxy deposits build up in one of the carotid arteries. The carotid arteries are blood vessels located on each side of your neck. This buildup of plaque (atherosclerosis) may restrict blood flow to your brain. Removing plaque causing the narrowing in the artery can improve blood flow in your carotid artery and reduce your risk of stroke.

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Coronary angioplasty (AN-jee-o-plas-tee), also called percutaneous coronary intervention, is a procedure used to open clogged heart arteries. Angioplasty involves temporarily inserting and inflating a tiny balloon where your artery is clogged to help widen the artery. Angioplasty is often combined with the permanent placement of a small wire mesh tube called a stent to help prop the artery open and decrease its chance of narrowing again. Some stents are coated with medication to help keep your artery open (drug-eluting stents), while others are not (bare-metal stents). Angioplasty can improve symptoms of blocked arteries, such as chest pain and shortness of breath. Angioplasty can also be used during a heart attack to quickly open a blocked artery and reduce the amount of damage to your heart.

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Our onsite Coumadin Clinic provides monitoring for patients who are on coumadin/warfarin blood thinners. Our staff will educate you on the proper use of this medication and dietary restrictions. They regularly monitor your INR to ensure you are on the correct dose of medication.

For our patients who have implantable devices such as a pacemaker or defibrillator we offer a device clinic. Our device clinic will work directly with your device manufacturer to ensure your device is being monitored appropriately.

Cardioversion is a medical procedure that restores a normal heart rhythm in people with certain types of abnormal heartbeats (arrhythmias). Cardioversion is usually done by sending electric shocks to your heart through electrodes placed on your chest. It’s also possible to do cardioversion with medications. This is usually a scheduled procedure that’s performed in a hospital. You should be able to go home the same day as your procedure.

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Also known as laser therapy, endovenous thermal ablation is a treatment for venous insufficiency and varicose veins that uses a laser or high-frequency radio waves to close a defective vein. In this procedure, your doctor will locate the vein using ultrasound and insert a catheter into the vein, usually just below the knee. Then a salt water solution and an anesthetic will be injected into the vein, followed by laser or radiofrequency waves. You’ll be given local or general anesthesia for this procedure, and you can expect to return home the same day.

An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) — a pager-sized device — is placed in your chest to reduce your risk of dying if the lower chambers of your heart (ventricles) go into a dangerous rhythm and stop beating effectively (cardiac arrest). You might need an ICD if you have a dangerously fast heartbeat (ventricular tachycardia) or a chaotic heartbeat that keeps your heart from supplying enough blood to the rest of your body (ventricular fibrillation).ICDs detect and stop abnormal heartbeats (arrhythmias). The device continuously monitors your heartbeat and delivers electrical pulses to restore a normal heart rhythm when necessary. An ICD differs from a pacemaker — another implantable device used to help control abnormal heart rhythms.

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Medication used to treat heart disease may be used to dilate or relax blood vessels, lower cholesterol, decrease blood pressure, reduce swelling, eliminate excess fluids, speed up or slow the heart’s rhythm, or prevent clots from forming in the blood.

A pacemaker is a small device with two parts — a generator and wires (leads, or electrodes) — that’s placed under the skin in your chest to help control your heartbeat. People may need a pacemaker for a variety of reasons — mostly due to one of a group of conditions called arrhythmias, in which the heart’s rhythm is abnormal. Normal aging of the heart may disrupt your heart rate, making it beat too slowly. Heart muscle damage resulting from a heart attack is another common cause of disruptions of your heartbeat. A pacemaker can often be implanted in your chest with a minor surgery. You may need to take some precautions in your daily life after your pacemaker is installed.

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Sclerotherapy is a procedure for treating spider veins and small varicose veins. An FDA approved medicine called Asclera™ (polidocanol) is injected into the vein using a small needle. This medicine results in a chemical reaction inside the lining of the vein which ultimately results in venous closure. Most insurance carriers cover sclerotherapy sessions as part of an overall treatment plan for venous reflux disease or as a separate entity depending on the insurance plan.